Horsey Meadows.


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We went boondocking again for a few days near Sundre, Alberta, Canada in the Bearberry Valley. It was the second time that we camped at this spot, the previous time was in the Spring of 2016. It was very quite and we only saw one truck loaded with quads pass by.

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Feral Horses as seen from our campsite.

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“Wild horses” or “feral horses”? The debate rages on in Alberta, Canada. The provincial government believes that the wild horses west of Sundre, Alberta are the descendants of domestic horses used in logging and guiding/outfitting operations in the early 1900’s. The Wild Horse Society of Alberta (WHOAS) believes that they are of Spanish descent. WHOAS is so sure of this that they have sent away DNA samples to the University of Texas, Equine Genetics Lab for testing.” – Wild Horses of Alberta

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We have named this spot Horsey Meadows.

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The good life.

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Skokijan and hubby on the quad.

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Skokijan wants to go for a ride in the truck.

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Even though it is summer, it got quite cool in the evenings, especially  with the wind.

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Skokijan.

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Kris.

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Hubby made a delicious Chicken “potjie” (pronunciation “poy-key”) (Afrikaans for a three-legged iron pot used for cooking over a wood fire) with vegetables. Our “Potjie oven” is made from a heavy walled Aluminum pot (a thrift-store special.)

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Corn on the cob, pork chops and fried eggs. We Steamed the corn in the pressure cooker on the Coleman Propane stove, then we basted them with olive oil before placing on the fire. 1-DSC_1574

Camping in Spring.

8 comments

  1. It looks beautiful there, and the horses are beautiful too. One of my Aussie friends, when we explained to her the Afrikaans diminutive form of -tjie, asked whether the main word for potjie was “poyk”. We had a good chuckle.

    Like

    • It is! The horses are amazing, I think they know us already, as they are not even afraid of the dogs.
      It is amazing that they can survive the winters here as well.
      Hee-hee 😉 just as long as we are sreading the word of a great dish.

      Liked by 1 person

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