Jasper National Park, Alberta, Canada


Athabasca Glacier. Please click for a larger view. Please see next photo for a close up of the cars and people in the foreground. Nikon D70 ©

Please see previous photo, this is a close up of the cars and people in the foreground.

Athabasca: “Where there are reeds” in Cree.

“Part of the Columbia Icefield The glacier currently recedes at a rate of 2-3 metres per yearand has receded more than 1.5 km in the past 125 years and lost over half of its volume. The glacier moves down from the icefield at a rate of several centimetres per day. Due to its close proximity to the Icefields Parkway, between the Alberta towns of  Banff and Jasper, and rather easy accessibility, it is the most visited glacier in North America. The leading edge of the glacier is within easy walking distance; however, travel onto the glacier is not recommended unless properly equipped. Hidden crevasses have led to the deaths of unprepared tourists. There’s a restaurant at the icefield centre.”-  Jasper National Park“.

“The Athabasca Glacier is one of the six principal ‘toes’ of the Columbia Icefield, located in the Canadian Rockies. The glacier currently recedes at a rate of 2–3 metres (6.6–9.8 ft) per year[1] and has receded more than 1.5 km (0.93 mi) in the past 125 years and lost over half of its volume. The glacier moves down from the icefield at a rate of several centimetres per day. Due to its close proximity to the Icefields Parkway, between the Alberta towns of Banff and Jasper, and rather easy accessibility, it is the most visited glacier in North America. The leading edge of the glacier is within easy walking distance; however, travel onto the glacier is not recommended unless properly equipped. Hidden crevasses have led to the deaths of unprepared tourists.”  – Wikipedia

Athabasca Glacier. Please click for larger view.Nikon ©

Close up of a snow coach. Please click on image. Nikon ©

“A snow coach is a specialized passenger transport vehicle, designed to operate over snow or ice, similar to a large, multi-passenger snowcat that is equipped with bus style seating. These vehicles may have multiple sets of very large low pressure tires or they may have tracks. Snow coaches may seat ten or more passengers and are often used for sightseeing tours or for over-snow transportation.” – Wikipedia

RV parking at Athabasca Glacier. Nikon D70 ©

Rain at Athabasca Glacier. Please click for larger view. Nikon D70 ©
Athabasca: “Where there are reeds” in Cree.

“A glacier (UK play /ˈɡlæsiə/glass-ee-ər or US /ˈɡlʃər/glay-shər) is a large persistent body of ice that forms where the accumulation of snow exceeds its ablation (melting and sublimation) over many years, often centuries. At least 0.1 km2 in area and 50 m thick, but often much larger, a glacier slowly deforms and flows due to stresses induced by its weight. Crevasses, seracs, and other distinguishing features of a glacier are due to its flow. Another consequence of glacier flow is the transport of rock and debris abraded from its substrate and resultant landforms like cirques and moraines. Glaciers form on land, often elevated, and are distinct from the much thinner sea ice and lake ice that form on the surface of bodies of water.” Wikipedia

People on Athabasca glacier. Please click for larger image. Nikon D70 ©

Please click here for a map of the Icefields Parkway

Athabasca Glacier. Please click for larger view. Nikon D300 ©

We went to Jasper National park again, we have been there twice before the last time was in the winter of 2006.

Bow Lake. Please click for larger image. Nikon D70 ©

We camped at the Snaring River campground in Jasper. We found the campground quite and private. There were many mosquitoes, but we made a fire, applied insect repel-ant and burnt our Citronella lantern which helped.

Black Bear in the Snaring River campground . Please click on image for larger view. Nikon D70 ©


Black Bear in the Snaring River campground . Please click on image for larger view. Nikon D70 ©

Hubby made delicious Oxtail Potjiekos. Please click on photo for larger image. ©

“Potjiekos” ( literally meaning pot-food) has been part of South Africa’s culture for many centuries. When the first Dutch settlers arrived in the Cape, they brought with them their ways of cooking food in heavy cast iron pots, which hung from the kitchen hearth above the fire.” South Africa Tours

Pyramid Lake in Jasper. Please click for larger view. Nikon D70 ©. “Pyramid Lake is kidney-shaped lake in Jasper National Park, Alberta, Canada. It lies at the foot of Pyramid Mountain, a natural landmark that overlooks the town of Jasper.” – Wikipedia

Pyramid Island on Pyramid Lake in Jasper.Please click for larger view. Nikon D70 ©.

View of the town of Jasper from the Jasper Tramway station.

jasper
Please click on map for a larger view.

On the road. Please click for larger view. Nikon D70 ©

On the road. Please click for larger view. Nikon D70 ©

Related

Holy Cow! Finally, Finally, Finally!!! ~ Jasper National Park

Exploring Jasper: Maligne Canyon

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Jasper National park 2006.
Please click for more.

Jasper National Park 2001 ©

Signature

About Tokeloshe.

Welcome and thank you for visiting. I have been happily married (sic) for 40 years, have one son, a loving daughter in law and three adorable grandsons. We have been in Canada for 20 years and are originally from South-Africa. My first language is Afrikaans. (Ek kan nog Afrikaans praat, lees en skryf.) I love doing mixed media, scrap-booking, blogging and playing on the computer, I am also interested in photography, genealogy, reading, hiking, camping, arts and crafts.
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12 Responses to Jasper National Park, Alberta, Canada

  1. colonialist says:

    Totally stunning. The glacier is amazing. The closeup of the vehicles gives such a good idea of scale – it is massive. Many of the other spots are very beautiful indeed. Pity about the skeets!

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  2. Hey Tok…what a beautiful place…would love to hike around there!!!

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  3. nrhatch says:

    Beautiful shots, Tok! Especially enjoyed seeing the BEAR and Bow Lake!

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  4. (Unllike other times and places (mentioned elsewhere) where someone was kind enough to take our picture, we did not worry about them running away with our camera — there was no place to run.) ======== The melting ice fills the rivers and lakes for many miles. Glacier water is milky near the glacier, then it gets more and more an emerald shade, then becomes clear as it travels further, and the sediment settles to the bottom. The color is a result of all the sediment suspended in the glacier ice for many years. There are several lakes that are a different shade of color as they are further from the glacier.

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  5. Pingback: Road Trip to Alaska 2012-Banff National Park to Jasper National Park Alberta, Canada « Experiencing My Journey

  6. Pingback: Road Trip To Alaska 2012-Jasper National Park to Alberta Highway 40 near Grande Cache, Alberta Canada « Experiencing My Journey

  7. Pingback: Road Trip To Alaska 2012-Jasper National Park to Alberta Highway 40 near Grande Cache, Alberta Canada | Experiencing My Journey

  8. Sartenada says:

    Amazing views and photos. Seems to be a place for me to visit.

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