Shuswap Lake


We went to Shuswap Lake in British Columbia, Canada for a few days. We have gone past there a few times on our way to Vancouver. We were very lucky to see two Black Bears, a Mountain Goat, a Moose calf and a few Deer along the road, but I wasn’t quick enough to take photos.

Beach

We camped at Shuswap Lake Provincial Park, which is beautiful, with large trees, peacefull, close to the lake and private. The weather was perfect. There were many birds and squirrels.

Copper Island.
There was still some snow on the mountains.
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Nikon D70 ©

“Copper Island is the only natural island in the Shuswap Lake. According to legend, Ta Lana the great bear sleeps under the island in a large cave. There is a hiking trail to the top of the island. The island is only accessible by boat (or a very strong swimmer). Copper Island also has some of the Shuswap’s pictographs as seen here.” – A Rover’s rest

Besides the beautiful beach, there are quite a few hiking trails as well.

Bird

A Falcon nest on the beach.
Nikon D300 ©

Bird

Falcon on the beach.
Nikon D300 ©

Geese

Geese
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Nikon D70 ©


Our camper.
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Nikon D70 ©

Besides privacy, the camp has hot showers, fire-pits, toilets, water, recycling, garbage cans and a Sani-dump.

View from our window
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Nikon D70 ©

There are great shops quite close to the park. Although we didn’t book ahead, I would suggest reserving over a weekend and in season as it is very popular. They accept cash only on site. Firewood is also available.

Tent Caterpillars on the beach.
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Nikon D70 ©

There were quite a few Salmon skeletons on the beach form the last Salmon Run.
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Nikon D70 ©

Dogs

As usual the dogs enjoyed themselves very much.
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Nikon D70 ©


Hubby did most of the cooking
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Nikon D70 ©


Relaxing with a great bottle of wine.
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Nikon D70 ©


I love staring into a fire.
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Nikon D70 ©

Stick figures
I thought I was dreaming, when I saw different colored stick figures walking past our camp one night.
Nikon D70 ©


The flash reveals all.
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Nikon D70 ©


My lap-dog.
Nikon D70 ©

Home
Going home
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Nikon D70 ©

“Shuswap Lake is a lake located in south-central British Columbia, Canada that drains via the Little River into Little Shuswap Lake. Little Shuswap Lake is the source of the South Thompson River, a branch of the Thompson River, a tributary of the Fraser River. It is at the heart of a region known as the Shuswap Country or “the Shuswap”, noted for its recreational lakeshore communities including the city of Salmon Arm. The name “Shuswap” is derived from the Shuswap or Secwepemc First Nations people, the most northern of the Interior Salish peoples, whose territory includes the Shuswap.”Wikipedia

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B.C. Vacation 2010

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8 comments

  1. Oh, I LOVED this, Tok!

    The fire is mesmerizing . . . and the stick figures made me laugh. What a beautiful spot to camp ~ gorgeous site, lovely beach, and canine companionship!

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  2. Didn’t the dogs try to eat the salmon skeletons?
    The fire, food and wine look very ‘gesellig’.
    And I laughed my head off at the stick figures 😀

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  3. Tokeloshe, I am at the Schuswap fairly often. My brother has a cottage on the lake and a close friend has a cabin back in on one of the mountain areas on the north side of the lake. When you are going to be there for a holiday, please let me know the dates and let’s see if we can coordinate anything.

    I can imagine the dogs rolling in the smelly ol’ salmon carcasses! I don’t know what Bokkoms is, but I can imagine!!

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  4. That’s wonderful, thank you 😉
    They would love to but wasn’t allowed as they sleep in the camper with us. We were however worried about the dogs eating them.
    “Bokkoms are Harders (Mullet) that are salted, then strung into bunches and hung up to dry. They are unique to this part of the (South-African ) West Coast …”

    My Dad grew up in the Cape and love them, I find them to salty. Hubby also loves them
    Years ago, my parents woke one night to scratching on their glass balcony door, they had forgotten that they had hung Bokkoms on the door knob outside. 😉

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